The English Post

Italian Minestrone

ITALIAN MINESTRONE
Written by Veronica Lavenia

Italian Minestrone is one of the oldest recipes of Italian cuisine, born in Northern Italy in the homes of peasants.

In 1891, Pellegrino Artusi, author of the most famous Italian cookbook, “The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating Well”, included this recipe in the book, giving minestrone the relevance usually reserved for much more high-standing dishes.

There is no single recipe, because this dish varies according to seasonal ingredients. Usually, in the spring, Italian minestrone has a greater wealth of vegetables and, for this, I think it is much more delicious to enjoy it in this season.

I love Minestrone with pasta but it is also perfect with good rustic bread.

Italian Minestrone: Ingredients

Serves 4

100 g (3½ oz) fresh peas

3 carrots

1 stalk of celery

2 potatoes

50 g (2 oz) green beans

10 cherry tomatoes

1 L (35 fl oz) vegetable broth

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 shallot

pinch of sea salt 

300 g (11 oz) short pasta

ITALIAN MINESTRONE

Veronica Lavenia

Italian Minestrone: Method

  1. Shell the peas, wash them and set aside. Wash the carrots, cut the ends off and slice.
  2. Wash the celery, remove the filaments and slice. Wash the parsley leaves, pat dry with paper towel and chop.
  3. Peel the potatoes and cut into cubes. Wash and clean the green beans.
  4. Heat the broth. In a large pot put the oil and coarsely chopped shallot.
  5. Cook over a low heat until it takes on a golden color. Add the peas and other vegetables.  Cook for 5 minutes over a high heat, stirring constantly.
  6. Add the vegetable broth and a pinch of salt and cook for 45 minutes over a low heat. Almost at the end of cooking, add the pasta. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil.

ITALIAN MINESTRONE

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About the author

Veronica Lavenia

Veronica, PhD, is an Italian based food writer. Born and raised in Italy, surrounded by the thriving culture and spirit of Sicily, Veronica was a University academic before becoming a food writer. In the context of academic research, she has published essays on the Spanish-American narrative in national and international Academic Journals. As freelance journalist, she wrote about book reviews and tennis. Food was the subject she thought about most so, inspired by family recipes, and valuable Italian culinary heritage, she moved into writing her experiences and studies on the subject.
Sustainability, seasonality and selection of raw materials (as much as possible local, organic and unrefined) are the basis of Veronica’s natural food philosophy.
Cookery author, "Gluten Free Heaven" magazine contributor, some of her works have appeared in "Vegetarian Living", "Veggie Magazine", "Lifestyle FOOD", "Australian Good Food & Travel Guide" and "Chickpea", among others.